The Haitian Donkey Makes Slow, Stumbling Headway

Hi All:

It appears that I have not written in quite a while.  As you all know, I am quite technologically challenged, so progress in that department moves at a snail’s pace.  I apologize for not keeping things more up to date, especially the progress in Haiti.  I finished another course of 4 weeks of Avycaz, the $1000/day IV antibiotic, now 9 days ago.  I felt pretty good throughout and have been hoping that this one will give me a longer infection free interval.  Three days after I was done, the low grade fevers, especially in the evenings, nausea, vomiting and feeling dragged out a bit continually restarted.  Thus, 4 days ago, I repeated my blood cultures and labs, the WBC is back up at 13,000 with a left shift, all signs pointing to a persistent/recurrent infection, but so far, the cultures are no growth.  However, at times it takes a week or so for them to grow out the bug.  My ostomy (the 3.5 x 2.5 inch hole in my lower abdomen) has been giving us grief as the bags are not large enough so lots of leaks.  Plus, my belly is quite scarred from all the surgeries and they make for little gaps to let the intestinal contents seep out and eat away at the skin.  Medicare has sent out an ostomy nurse for 22 visits, but so far, she has struggled even more with leaks as has never seen such a large hole and is running out of ideas.  Jenn and Rachel have a good handle on it, but have to return to their jobs soon and will be less available.  Several of my former Georgetown Med Center coworkers have volunteered to help out, I am humbled and appreciative and we will embark on that soon to try to improve the situation.

I have been working on getting supplies for Haiti with the Covid limitations, also looking to establish long term routes for others to continue this in my absence.  Allegedly, the Health Department states that there have been over 5,000 cases and about 100 deaths, but how accurate that might be is a bit up in the air, as only government hospitals have limited testing supplies.  Dr. Moise and I contact each other regularly on WhatsApp, when the connection is reasonable, and things seem stable at the hospital, though volume is down due to the fears of Covid.  School kids are especially hard hit, as very few families have a computer or access to one and the last year of frequent rioting has made for little progress as classes frequently were cancelled for safety reasons, so the Covid only adds insult to injury to these struggling students. 

At present, our hospital uses masks, but I wonder how many people out in the villages have access to one or even the understanding of the need to wear one, etc.  Since clean water is scarce in the best of times, washing techniques are used in a limited sense.  Food supplies do go from the rural areas like ours to Port, etc, on trucks piled high with the containers full of food supplies, the vendors sitting on the top of the supplies (need to duck for trees/branches, etc) so social distancing and proper handling of the food is the proverbial “pie in the sky.”  Each vendor knows which sacks of cabbages, etc, belongs to him/her when they arrive at the market and off load them.  I am concerned that, in general, fear of evil spirits, etc is more prevalent in Haiti and the Covid pandemic will only increase their anxiety levels, more even than it is doing in the rest of the world. 

When I took over the leadership at CSL, now 17 yr ago, there were many areas that needed attention and direction.  I thank the Lord that, thanks especially to Ulrike Shaller, the German physiotherapist, the PT department is making great strides and progress.  That will leave only the dental department, a place where I am really in over my head.  Would you be so kind to pray that God would send a faithful, Christian dentist who could head up that department and be able to work with our limited situation and make it functional for the glory of God?  Another prayer request is that we can locate an experienced Christian ultrasound technician who could come out for 2 weeks or so and train Dr. William in doing and reading ultrasounds after he comes in October, Lord Willing, to join us full time.  Vi Anderson, who came out and taught Dr. Moise, is unable to come again due to health reasons, so looking for someone who could get Dr. William grounded in the technique and reading.  Moise is an excellent ultrasonographer and surgeon, but sometimes those who learn and can do things so quickly don’t necessarily make great teachers, shall we say.  Those of us donkeys, who are not necessarily the brightest and best, can plod along more slowly and accommodate pupils who learn at our own pace better. 

As always, thank you so much for your prayers, support and encouragement for us as we strive to serve our Saviour at Centre de Sante Lumiere for His glory. 

In His Service,

Bill, James, Jenn, Rachel and the rest of the Haiti Team